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Eating on the Moon in Amsterdam

Eating on the Moon in Amsterdam


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Everyone loves Amsterdam, city of free thinking, canals, weed, and fabulous art. These days, even the art museum, the Rijksmuseum, has a Michelin star for its in-house restaurant Rijks.

Another significant new foodie landmark is Moon, the revolving restaurant at the top of the former-Shell tower on the north bank of the IJ River. This is a wow-factor restaurant, for champagne glass-clinking and Insta-bound selfies in front of the view. The circular restaurant undergoes one revolution per hour, and all tables are arranged so everyone’s facing outwards for the spectacular panoramas. Even on a gray day, you can see for miles, turning toward Amsterdam Old Town, and then out along the IJ, then back inland to the greenery of Amsterdam Noord and beyond. While I dined, the sun set, and the sky just got progressively greyer. “That’s a Dutch sunset!” my local friend said. Luckily, this view is so good, it doesn’t even need a peep of golden rays.

The food has a lot to live up to, and on offer is a five- or seven-course menu, each with vaguely spacy connotations.

It all starts with a moon-like silvered margerita-filled edible pearl to prime the palate. This sets the scene for a meal that’s pretentious but fun. An oyster arrives with green curry and cucumber yoghurt, tangy and satisfying, if a little unnecessary. Herring, the Dutch national fish, makes an appearance and is deliciously sweet and sour, served with sweet onion, beet and salty caviar, combined with a mellow horseradish cream.

Sweetbreads are accompanied by orange and clove sauce, poured at the table, which are the overpowering takeaway flavors of this dish (a slight relief, as sweetbreads always make me nervous), and matched with Cantayano Spanish wine, which is barrel oaked for 18 months, as oaky as a country kitchen. My heart slightly sinks when I see foam atop the risotto that follows. Why foam? Why? But there’s a truffle topping, which is usually a good thing, and again the wine pairing sings out, a summery Unlitro from Tuscany, a fresh, light berry wine with strawberry notes. The tender lamb main comes with a salty sauce and a kind of rosemary tar offset by some asparagus that offers a lovely fresh crunch.

By the time I get to dessert, a moon landing of a dish, with its delicately silvered chocolate, I’m feeling overwhelmed by stratospheric overeating. This is space travel that really brings you down to earth: a gastronomic, panoramic experience that’s a lot of fun, but if you go for it, opt for five courses rather than our greedy seven, and schedule in a few bike rides along Amsterdam’s enchantingly pretty, townhouse-lined canals to work off some of that cosmic energy.


From Apollo to Artemis — How Astronaut Food May Change When We Return to the Moon

Future astronauts might eat very old food and fresh vegetables.

Apollo astronauts had to deal with questionable flavors and lackluster options while dining in space. When humans return to the moon with NASA's Artemis program, the menu might be very different, including packaged foods that are many years old alongside fresh fruits and vegetables.

In the earliest days of spaceflight, trips were so short that food was almost an afterthought: "The first food was basically tubes and cubes," Michele Perchonok, a food scientist who previously worked at NASA as the HRP advanced food technology project manager and the shuttle food system manager, told Space.com.

But, as the Apollo astronauts began to spend more than just a few hours in space, NASA had to re-think what they should eat and how it should be made and packaged. Astronauts with Mercury and Gemini had issues maintaining body weight and overall health, and so dietary changes were essential to the program.

Apollo astronaut food had to be lightweight, quick to prepare, well contained, nutritious, calorific enough to maintain crew weight, and it couldn't pose a threat to crew health, as there were concerns that astronauts eating in zero gravity might choke on their food.

Astronauts on the Apollo missions were the first to have hot water, which improved taste (though the astronauts would likely testify that it still wasn't great) and expanded menu options by making rehydration easier. The Apollo astronauts also tested the then-new "spoon bowl," a plastic bowl that could hold food, which could then be eaten with a spoon (a revolutionary space food technology at the time).

Before each Apollo launch, the crewmembers and their backups selected their preferred food items from the roughly 70 available menu items that could be packaged and sent to space. These items were then organized into balanced meals and scheduled for the duration of each mission. For the Apollo astronauts, breakfast might include applesauce, a breakfast drink, sausage patties and cinnamon bread cubes lunch might include chicken sandwiches, coconut cubes, sugar cookie cubes and cocoa and dinner might include spaghetti with meat sauce, cheese sandwiches, banana pudding, pineapple fruitcake and a grapefruit drink.

From Gemini onward, NASA astronauts have also had the option of selecting shrimp cocktail, and it has remained a favorite among them throughout the years. Easy to freeze-dry, shrimp allegedly tastes about the same in space as it does on Earth. Astronauts have also reported dulled taste buds and nasal congestion in space, making spicier additions like cocktail sauce hit items.

Chocolate also continues to be a favorite among astronauts. "The crewman has to be very careful about adjusting to a lack of gravity sensation. We had very small shrimp that had a little bit of cocktail sauce, and when exposed to water, were very, very tasty," Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin said in a Reddit AMA.

Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins also notably enjoyed hot coffee in space as he orbited the moon. "Behind the Moon, I was by myself — all alone but not lonesome," Collins said in a Google video celebrating the 50th anniversary of the mission. "I felt very comfortable back there I even had hot coffee," he said.


From Apollo to Artemis — How Astronaut Food May Change When We Return to the Moon

Future astronauts might eat very old food and fresh vegetables.

Apollo astronauts had to deal with questionable flavors and lackluster options while dining in space. When humans return to the moon with NASA's Artemis program, the menu might be very different, including packaged foods that are many years old alongside fresh fruits and vegetables.

In the earliest days of spaceflight, trips were so short that food was almost an afterthought: "The first food was basically tubes and cubes," Michele Perchonok, a food scientist who previously worked at NASA as the HRP advanced food technology project manager and the shuttle food system manager, told Space.com.

But, as the Apollo astronauts began to spend more than just a few hours in space, NASA had to re-think what they should eat and how it should be made and packaged. Astronauts with Mercury and Gemini had issues maintaining body weight and overall health, and so dietary changes were essential to the program.

Apollo astronaut food had to be lightweight, quick to prepare, well contained, nutritious, calorific enough to maintain crew weight, and it couldn't pose a threat to crew health, as there were concerns that astronauts eating in zero gravity might choke on their food.

Astronauts on the Apollo missions were the first to have hot water, which improved taste (though the astronauts would likely testify that it still wasn't great) and expanded menu options by making rehydration easier. The Apollo astronauts also tested the then-new "spoon bowl," a plastic bowl that could hold food, which could then be eaten with a spoon (a revolutionary space food technology at the time).

Before each Apollo launch, the crewmembers and their backups selected their preferred food items from the roughly 70 available menu items that could be packaged and sent to space. These items were then organized into balanced meals and scheduled for the duration of each mission. For the Apollo astronauts, breakfast might include applesauce, a breakfast drink, sausage patties and cinnamon bread cubes lunch might include chicken sandwiches, coconut cubes, sugar cookie cubes and cocoa and dinner might include spaghetti with meat sauce, cheese sandwiches, banana pudding, pineapple fruitcake and a grapefruit drink.

From Gemini onward, NASA astronauts have also had the option of selecting shrimp cocktail, and it has remained a favorite among them throughout the years. Easy to freeze-dry, shrimp allegedly tastes about the same in space as it does on Earth. Astronauts have also reported dulled taste buds and nasal congestion in space, making spicier additions like cocktail sauce hit items.

Chocolate also continues to be a favorite among astronauts. "The crewman has to be very careful about adjusting to a lack of gravity sensation. We had very small shrimp that had a little bit of cocktail sauce, and when exposed to water, were very, very tasty," Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin said in a Reddit AMA.

Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins also notably enjoyed hot coffee in space as he orbited the moon. "Behind the Moon, I was by myself — all alone but not lonesome," Collins said in a Google video celebrating the 50th anniversary of the mission. "I felt very comfortable back there I even had hot coffee," he said.


From Apollo to Artemis — How Astronaut Food May Change When We Return to the Moon

Future astronauts might eat very old food and fresh vegetables.

Apollo astronauts had to deal with questionable flavors and lackluster options while dining in space. When humans return to the moon with NASA's Artemis program, the menu might be very different, including packaged foods that are many years old alongside fresh fruits and vegetables.

In the earliest days of spaceflight, trips were so short that food was almost an afterthought: "The first food was basically tubes and cubes," Michele Perchonok, a food scientist who previously worked at NASA as the HRP advanced food technology project manager and the shuttle food system manager, told Space.com.

But, as the Apollo astronauts began to spend more than just a few hours in space, NASA had to re-think what they should eat and how it should be made and packaged. Astronauts with Mercury and Gemini had issues maintaining body weight and overall health, and so dietary changes were essential to the program.

Apollo astronaut food had to be lightweight, quick to prepare, well contained, nutritious, calorific enough to maintain crew weight, and it couldn't pose a threat to crew health, as there were concerns that astronauts eating in zero gravity might choke on their food.

Astronauts on the Apollo missions were the first to have hot water, which improved taste (though the astronauts would likely testify that it still wasn't great) and expanded menu options by making rehydration easier. The Apollo astronauts also tested the then-new "spoon bowl," a plastic bowl that could hold food, which could then be eaten with a spoon (a revolutionary space food technology at the time).

Before each Apollo launch, the crewmembers and their backups selected their preferred food items from the roughly 70 available menu items that could be packaged and sent to space. These items were then organized into balanced meals and scheduled for the duration of each mission. For the Apollo astronauts, breakfast might include applesauce, a breakfast drink, sausage patties and cinnamon bread cubes lunch might include chicken sandwiches, coconut cubes, sugar cookie cubes and cocoa and dinner might include spaghetti with meat sauce, cheese sandwiches, banana pudding, pineapple fruitcake and a grapefruit drink.

From Gemini onward, NASA astronauts have also had the option of selecting shrimp cocktail, and it has remained a favorite among them throughout the years. Easy to freeze-dry, shrimp allegedly tastes about the same in space as it does on Earth. Astronauts have also reported dulled taste buds and nasal congestion in space, making spicier additions like cocktail sauce hit items.

Chocolate also continues to be a favorite among astronauts. "The crewman has to be very careful about adjusting to a lack of gravity sensation. We had very small shrimp that had a little bit of cocktail sauce, and when exposed to water, were very, very tasty," Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin said in a Reddit AMA.

Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins also notably enjoyed hot coffee in space as he orbited the moon. "Behind the Moon, I was by myself — all alone but not lonesome," Collins said in a Google video celebrating the 50th anniversary of the mission. "I felt very comfortable back there I even had hot coffee," he said.


From Apollo to Artemis — How Astronaut Food May Change When We Return to the Moon

Future astronauts might eat very old food and fresh vegetables.

Apollo astronauts had to deal with questionable flavors and lackluster options while dining in space. When humans return to the moon with NASA's Artemis program, the menu might be very different, including packaged foods that are many years old alongside fresh fruits and vegetables.

In the earliest days of spaceflight, trips were so short that food was almost an afterthought: "The first food was basically tubes and cubes," Michele Perchonok, a food scientist who previously worked at NASA as the HRP advanced food technology project manager and the shuttle food system manager, told Space.com.

But, as the Apollo astronauts began to spend more than just a few hours in space, NASA had to re-think what they should eat and how it should be made and packaged. Astronauts with Mercury and Gemini had issues maintaining body weight and overall health, and so dietary changes were essential to the program.

Apollo astronaut food had to be lightweight, quick to prepare, well contained, nutritious, calorific enough to maintain crew weight, and it couldn't pose a threat to crew health, as there were concerns that astronauts eating in zero gravity might choke on their food.

Astronauts on the Apollo missions were the first to have hot water, which improved taste (though the astronauts would likely testify that it still wasn't great) and expanded menu options by making rehydration easier. The Apollo astronauts also tested the then-new "spoon bowl," a plastic bowl that could hold food, which could then be eaten with a spoon (a revolutionary space food technology at the time).

Before each Apollo launch, the crewmembers and their backups selected their preferred food items from the roughly 70 available menu items that could be packaged and sent to space. These items were then organized into balanced meals and scheduled for the duration of each mission. For the Apollo astronauts, breakfast might include applesauce, a breakfast drink, sausage patties and cinnamon bread cubes lunch might include chicken sandwiches, coconut cubes, sugar cookie cubes and cocoa and dinner might include spaghetti with meat sauce, cheese sandwiches, banana pudding, pineapple fruitcake and a grapefruit drink.

From Gemini onward, NASA astronauts have also had the option of selecting shrimp cocktail, and it has remained a favorite among them throughout the years. Easy to freeze-dry, shrimp allegedly tastes about the same in space as it does on Earth. Astronauts have also reported dulled taste buds and nasal congestion in space, making spicier additions like cocktail sauce hit items.

Chocolate also continues to be a favorite among astronauts. "The crewman has to be very careful about adjusting to a lack of gravity sensation. We had very small shrimp that had a little bit of cocktail sauce, and when exposed to water, were very, very tasty," Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin said in a Reddit AMA.

Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins also notably enjoyed hot coffee in space as he orbited the moon. "Behind the Moon, I was by myself — all alone but not lonesome," Collins said in a Google video celebrating the 50th anniversary of the mission. "I felt very comfortable back there I even had hot coffee," he said.


From Apollo to Artemis — How Astronaut Food May Change When We Return to the Moon

Future astronauts might eat very old food and fresh vegetables.

Apollo astronauts had to deal with questionable flavors and lackluster options while dining in space. When humans return to the moon with NASA's Artemis program, the menu might be very different, including packaged foods that are many years old alongside fresh fruits and vegetables.

In the earliest days of spaceflight, trips were so short that food was almost an afterthought: "The first food was basically tubes and cubes," Michele Perchonok, a food scientist who previously worked at NASA as the HRP advanced food technology project manager and the shuttle food system manager, told Space.com.

But, as the Apollo astronauts began to spend more than just a few hours in space, NASA had to re-think what they should eat and how it should be made and packaged. Astronauts with Mercury and Gemini had issues maintaining body weight and overall health, and so dietary changes were essential to the program.

Apollo astronaut food had to be lightweight, quick to prepare, well contained, nutritious, calorific enough to maintain crew weight, and it couldn't pose a threat to crew health, as there were concerns that astronauts eating in zero gravity might choke on their food.

Astronauts on the Apollo missions were the first to have hot water, which improved taste (though the astronauts would likely testify that it still wasn't great) and expanded menu options by making rehydration easier. The Apollo astronauts also tested the then-new "spoon bowl," a plastic bowl that could hold food, which could then be eaten with a spoon (a revolutionary space food technology at the time).

Before each Apollo launch, the crewmembers and their backups selected their preferred food items from the roughly 70 available menu items that could be packaged and sent to space. These items were then organized into balanced meals and scheduled for the duration of each mission. For the Apollo astronauts, breakfast might include applesauce, a breakfast drink, sausage patties and cinnamon bread cubes lunch might include chicken sandwiches, coconut cubes, sugar cookie cubes and cocoa and dinner might include spaghetti with meat sauce, cheese sandwiches, banana pudding, pineapple fruitcake and a grapefruit drink.

From Gemini onward, NASA astronauts have also had the option of selecting shrimp cocktail, and it has remained a favorite among them throughout the years. Easy to freeze-dry, shrimp allegedly tastes about the same in space as it does on Earth. Astronauts have also reported dulled taste buds and nasal congestion in space, making spicier additions like cocktail sauce hit items.

Chocolate also continues to be a favorite among astronauts. "The crewman has to be very careful about adjusting to a lack of gravity sensation. We had very small shrimp that had a little bit of cocktail sauce, and when exposed to water, were very, very tasty," Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin said in a Reddit AMA.

Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins also notably enjoyed hot coffee in space as he orbited the moon. "Behind the Moon, I was by myself — all alone but not lonesome," Collins said in a Google video celebrating the 50th anniversary of the mission. "I felt very comfortable back there I even had hot coffee," he said.


From Apollo to Artemis — How Astronaut Food May Change When We Return to the Moon

Future astronauts might eat very old food and fresh vegetables.

Apollo astronauts had to deal with questionable flavors and lackluster options while dining in space. When humans return to the moon with NASA's Artemis program, the menu might be very different, including packaged foods that are many years old alongside fresh fruits and vegetables.

In the earliest days of spaceflight, trips were so short that food was almost an afterthought: "The first food was basically tubes and cubes," Michele Perchonok, a food scientist who previously worked at NASA as the HRP advanced food technology project manager and the shuttle food system manager, told Space.com.

But, as the Apollo astronauts began to spend more than just a few hours in space, NASA had to re-think what they should eat and how it should be made and packaged. Astronauts with Mercury and Gemini had issues maintaining body weight and overall health, and so dietary changes were essential to the program.

Apollo astronaut food had to be lightweight, quick to prepare, well contained, nutritious, calorific enough to maintain crew weight, and it couldn't pose a threat to crew health, as there were concerns that astronauts eating in zero gravity might choke on their food.

Astronauts on the Apollo missions were the first to have hot water, which improved taste (though the astronauts would likely testify that it still wasn't great) and expanded menu options by making rehydration easier. The Apollo astronauts also tested the then-new "spoon bowl," a plastic bowl that could hold food, which could then be eaten with a spoon (a revolutionary space food technology at the time).

Before each Apollo launch, the crewmembers and their backups selected their preferred food items from the roughly 70 available menu items that could be packaged and sent to space. These items were then organized into balanced meals and scheduled for the duration of each mission. For the Apollo astronauts, breakfast might include applesauce, a breakfast drink, sausage patties and cinnamon bread cubes lunch might include chicken sandwiches, coconut cubes, sugar cookie cubes and cocoa and dinner might include spaghetti with meat sauce, cheese sandwiches, banana pudding, pineapple fruitcake and a grapefruit drink.

From Gemini onward, NASA astronauts have also had the option of selecting shrimp cocktail, and it has remained a favorite among them throughout the years. Easy to freeze-dry, shrimp allegedly tastes about the same in space as it does on Earth. Astronauts have also reported dulled taste buds and nasal congestion in space, making spicier additions like cocktail sauce hit items.

Chocolate also continues to be a favorite among astronauts. "The crewman has to be very careful about adjusting to a lack of gravity sensation. We had very small shrimp that had a little bit of cocktail sauce, and when exposed to water, were very, very tasty," Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin said in a Reddit AMA.

Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins also notably enjoyed hot coffee in space as he orbited the moon. "Behind the Moon, I was by myself — all alone but not lonesome," Collins said in a Google video celebrating the 50th anniversary of the mission. "I felt very comfortable back there I even had hot coffee," he said.


From Apollo to Artemis — How Astronaut Food May Change When We Return to the Moon

Future astronauts might eat very old food and fresh vegetables.

Apollo astronauts had to deal with questionable flavors and lackluster options while dining in space. When humans return to the moon with NASA's Artemis program, the menu might be very different, including packaged foods that are many years old alongside fresh fruits and vegetables.

In the earliest days of spaceflight, trips were so short that food was almost an afterthought: "The first food was basically tubes and cubes," Michele Perchonok, a food scientist who previously worked at NASA as the HRP advanced food technology project manager and the shuttle food system manager, told Space.com.

But, as the Apollo astronauts began to spend more than just a few hours in space, NASA had to re-think what they should eat and how it should be made and packaged. Astronauts with Mercury and Gemini had issues maintaining body weight and overall health, and so dietary changes were essential to the program.

Apollo astronaut food had to be lightweight, quick to prepare, well contained, nutritious, calorific enough to maintain crew weight, and it couldn't pose a threat to crew health, as there were concerns that astronauts eating in zero gravity might choke on their food.

Astronauts on the Apollo missions were the first to have hot water, which improved taste (though the astronauts would likely testify that it still wasn't great) and expanded menu options by making rehydration easier. The Apollo astronauts also tested the then-new "spoon bowl," a plastic bowl that could hold food, which could then be eaten with a spoon (a revolutionary space food technology at the time).

Before each Apollo launch, the crewmembers and their backups selected their preferred food items from the roughly 70 available menu items that could be packaged and sent to space. These items were then organized into balanced meals and scheduled for the duration of each mission. For the Apollo astronauts, breakfast might include applesauce, a breakfast drink, sausage patties and cinnamon bread cubes lunch might include chicken sandwiches, coconut cubes, sugar cookie cubes and cocoa and dinner might include spaghetti with meat sauce, cheese sandwiches, banana pudding, pineapple fruitcake and a grapefruit drink.

From Gemini onward, NASA astronauts have also had the option of selecting shrimp cocktail, and it has remained a favorite among them throughout the years. Easy to freeze-dry, shrimp allegedly tastes about the same in space as it does on Earth. Astronauts have also reported dulled taste buds and nasal congestion in space, making spicier additions like cocktail sauce hit items.

Chocolate also continues to be a favorite among astronauts. "The crewman has to be very careful about adjusting to a lack of gravity sensation. We had very small shrimp that had a little bit of cocktail sauce, and when exposed to water, were very, very tasty," Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin said in a Reddit AMA.

Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins also notably enjoyed hot coffee in space as he orbited the moon. "Behind the Moon, I was by myself — all alone but not lonesome," Collins said in a Google video celebrating the 50th anniversary of the mission. "I felt very comfortable back there I even had hot coffee," he said.


From Apollo to Artemis — How Astronaut Food May Change When We Return to the Moon

Future astronauts might eat very old food and fresh vegetables.

Apollo astronauts had to deal with questionable flavors and lackluster options while dining in space. When humans return to the moon with NASA's Artemis program, the menu might be very different, including packaged foods that are many years old alongside fresh fruits and vegetables.

In the earliest days of spaceflight, trips were so short that food was almost an afterthought: "The first food was basically tubes and cubes," Michele Perchonok, a food scientist who previously worked at NASA as the HRP advanced food technology project manager and the shuttle food system manager, told Space.com.

But, as the Apollo astronauts began to spend more than just a few hours in space, NASA had to re-think what they should eat and how it should be made and packaged. Astronauts with Mercury and Gemini had issues maintaining body weight and overall health, and so dietary changes were essential to the program.

Apollo astronaut food had to be lightweight, quick to prepare, well contained, nutritious, calorific enough to maintain crew weight, and it couldn't pose a threat to crew health, as there were concerns that astronauts eating in zero gravity might choke on their food.

Astronauts on the Apollo missions were the first to have hot water, which improved taste (though the astronauts would likely testify that it still wasn't great) and expanded menu options by making rehydration easier. The Apollo astronauts also tested the then-new "spoon bowl," a plastic bowl that could hold food, which could then be eaten with a spoon (a revolutionary space food technology at the time).

Before each Apollo launch, the crewmembers and their backups selected their preferred food items from the roughly 70 available menu items that could be packaged and sent to space. These items were then organized into balanced meals and scheduled for the duration of each mission. For the Apollo astronauts, breakfast might include applesauce, a breakfast drink, sausage patties and cinnamon bread cubes lunch might include chicken sandwiches, coconut cubes, sugar cookie cubes and cocoa and dinner might include spaghetti with meat sauce, cheese sandwiches, banana pudding, pineapple fruitcake and a grapefruit drink.

From Gemini onward, NASA astronauts have also had the option of selecting shrimp cocktail, and it has remained a favorite among them throughout the years. Easy to freeze-dry, shrimp allegedly tastes about the same in space as it does on Earth. Astronauts have also reported dulled taste buds and nasal congestion in space, making spicier additions like cocktail sauce hit items.

Chocolate also continues to be a favorite among astronauts. "The crewman has to be very careful about adjusting to a lack of gravity sensation. We had very small shrimp that had a little bit of cocktail sauce, and when exposed to water, were very, very tasty," Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin said in a Reddit AMA.

Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins also notably enjoyed hot coffee in space as he orbited the moon. "Behind the Moon, I was by myself — all alone but not lonesome," Collins said in a Google video celebrating the 50th anniversary of the mission. "I felt very comfortable back there I even had hot coffee," he said.


From Apollo to Artemis — How Astronaut Food May Change When We Return to the Moon

Future astronauts might eat very old food and fresh vegetables.

Apollo astronauts had to deal with questionable flavors and lackluster options while dining in space. When humans return to the moon with NASA's Artemis program, the menu might be very different, including packaged foods that are many years old alongside fresh fruits and vegetables.

In the earliest days of spaceflight, trips were so short that food was almost an afterthought: "The first food was basically tubes and cubes," Michele Perchonok, a food scientist who previously worked at NASA as the HRP advanced food technology project manager and the shuttle food system manager, told Space.com.

But, as the Apollo astronauts began to spend more than just a few hours in space, NASA had to re-think what they should eat and how it should be made and packaged. Astronauts with Mercury and Gemini had issues maintaining body weight and overall health, and so dietary changes were essential to the program.

Apollo astronaut food had to be lightweight, quick to prepare, well contained, nutritious, calorific enough to maintain crew weight, and it couldn't pose a threat to crew health, as there were concerns that astronauts eating in zero gravity might choke on their food.

Astronauts on the Apollo missions were the first to have hot water, which improved taste (though the astronauts would likely testify that it still wasn't great) and expanded menu options by making rehydration easier. The Apollo astronauts also tested the then-new "spoon bowl," a plastic bowl that could hold food, which could then be eaten with a spoon (a revolutionary space food technology at the time).

Before each Apollo launch, the crewmembers and their backups selected their preferred food items from the roughly 70 available menu items that could be packaged and sent to space. These items were then organized into balanced meals and scheduled for the duration of each mission. For the Apollo astronauts, breakfast might include applesauce, a breakfast drink, sausage patties and cinnamon bread cubes lunch might include chicken sandwiches, coconut cubes, sugar cookie cubes and cocoa and dinner might include spaghetti with meat sauce, cheese sandwiches, banana pudding, pineapple fruitcake and a grapefruit drink.

From Gemini onward, NASA astronauts have also had the option of selecting shrimp cocktail, and it has remained a favorite among them throughout the years. Easy to freeze-dry, shrimp allegedly tastes about the same in space as it does on Earth. Astronauts have also reported dulled taste buds and nasal congestion in space, making spicier additions like cocktail sauce hit items.

Chocolate also continues to be a favorite among astronauts. "The crewman has to be very careful about adjusting to a lack of gravity sensation. We had very small shrimp that had a little bit of cocktail sauce, and when exposed to water, were very, very tasty," Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin said in a Reddit AMA.

Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins also notably enjoyed hot coffee in space as he orbited the moon. "Behind the Moon, I was by myself — all alone but not lonesome," Collins said in a Google video celebrating the 50th anniversary of the mission. "I felt very comfortable back there I even had hot coffee," he said.


From Apollo to Artemis — How Astronaut Food May Change When We Return to the Moon

Future astronauts might eat very old food and fresh vegetables.

Apollo astronauts had to deal with questionable flavors and lackluster options while dining in space. When humans return to the moon with NASA's Artemis program, the menu might be very different, including packaged foods that are many years old alongside fresh fruits and vegetables.

In the earliest days of spaceflight, trips were so short that food was almost an afterthought: "The first food was basically tubes and cubes," Michele Perchonok, a food scientist who previously worked at NASA as the HRP advanced food technology project manager and the shuttle food system manager, told Space.com.

But, as the Apollo astronauts began to spend more than just a few hours in space, NASA had to re-think what they should eat and how it should be made and packaged. Astronauts with Mercury and Gemini had issues maintaining body weight and overall health, and so dietary changes were essential to the program.

Apollo astronaut food had to be lightweight, quick to prepare, well contained, nutritious, calorific enough to maintain crew weight, and it couldn't pose a threat to crew health, as there were concerns that astronauts eating in zero gravity might choke on their food.

Astronauts on the Apollo missions were the first to have hot water, which improved taste (though the astronauts would likely testify that it still wasn't great) and expanded menu options by making rehydration easier. The Apollo astronauts also tested the then-new "spoon bowl," a plastic bowl that could hold food, which could then be eaten with a spoon (a revolutionary space food technology at the time).

Before each Apollo launch, the crewmembers and their backups selected their preferred food items from the roughly 70 available menu items that could be packaged and sent to space. These items were then organized into balanced meals and scheduled for the duration of each mission. For the Apollo astronauts, breakfast might include applesauce, a breakfast drink, sausage patties and cinnamon bread cubes lunch might include chicken sandwiches, coconut cubes, sugar cookie cubes and cocoa and dinner might include spaghetti with meat sauce, cheese sandwiches, banana pudding, pineapple fruitcake and a grapefruit drink.

From Gemini onward, NASA astronauts have also had the option of selecting shrimp cocktail, and it has remained a favorite among them throughout the years. Easy to freeze-dry, shrimp allegedly tastes about the same in space as it does on Earth. Astronauts have also reported dulled taste buds and nasal congestion in space, making spicier additions like cocktail sauce hit items.

Chocolate also continues to be a favorite among astronauts. "The crewman has to be very careful about adjusting to a lack of gravity sensation. We had very small shrimp that had a little bit of cocktail sauce, and when exposed to water, were very, very tasty," Apollo 11 astronaut Buzz Aldrin said in a Reddit AMA.

Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins also notably enjoyed hot coffee in space as he orbited the moon. "Behind the Moon, I was by myself — all alone but not lonesome," Collins said in a Google video celebrating the 50th anniversary of the mission. "I felt very comfortable back there I even had hot coffee," he said.


Watch the video: SUMO JAPANESE RESTAURANT - AMSTERDAM LEIDSEPLEIN - JUNE 2020 (May 2022).


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