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Cheat's dulce de leche recipe

Cheat's dulce de leche recipe


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Dulce de leche is a rich and delicious caramel made from milk and sugar. So this it the cheat's version, made with butter and evaporated milk. It's not as thick, but it is still delicious and tastes great drizzled over puddings and cakes.

6 people made this

IngredientsServes: 12

  • 175g butter
  • 100g caster sugar
  • 125ml evaporated milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

MethodPrep:2min ›Cook:10min ›Ready in:12min

  1. In a saucepan combine the butter, evaporated milk, caster sugar and the vanilla extract. Bring to the boil over medium high heat and continue to cook for 5 minutes, stirring. Pour over your choice of cake while syrup is still warm.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(9)

Reviews in English (7)

by Dakshna

I found this syrup GREAT!!it tastes jus as good on plain ol' butter cake..I poured it over the cake,when still warm and sprinkled chopped up pieces of almonds over that...The result was delicious..Some might find it a lil too sweet to their liking,but overall my family loved it..thank you so much for this!!-15 Jun 2008

by AmyJo

I made this to go with some banana pancakes. I knew the pancakes would have really strong flavor all by themselves, so I didn't want a really flavorful syrup, but this was basically just sugar. I think next time I will try adding some nutmeg or something...-02 Apr 2012

by Holiday Baker

I decided to try this recipe for an this site faceless recipes challenge (recipes without photos). It has a good flavor. It kind of looks like melted butter, but has a taste like a not overly sweet butterscotch. I made 1/2 recipe, because I didn't need a full cup of syrup. I also lowered the sat. fat a bit, and it didn't seem to affect the recipe. For half the recipe I used 2 Tblsp. of butter and the rest a light margarine and used 1% milk instead of evaporated to avoid wasting a full can for the small amount. I have found that syrups tend to turn to a caramel on med-high, so I cooked it on medium or 5 on my stove. According to the introduction, it is meant for cakes, but it was fine warm on pancake puffs (ebelskivers).-19 Feb 2012

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Cheat’s Millionaire Shortbread: Make From Scratch in 30 mins

Ingredientsmakes a small tray
125g plain flour
30g cornflour
50g caster sugar
100g butter (left out of the fridge for 5mins or so)
397g tin of Carnation’s Caramel or dulce de leche
150g dark/milk chocolate or a mixture of both

How to prepare
Preheat the oven to 160 degrees C / gas mark 3. In a bowl, mix the flours together, sprinkle in the sugar and add the butter, cutting it into small pieces.

Think crumble at this point and use your fingers to rub in the butter and create a sandy version of breadcrumbs. Once the butter has been rubbed in, the mixture will begin to stick together. Press the ‘dough’ together to create a ball of sorts. The butter will hold the mixture together without the need for any liquid at all.

Press the mixture into a small baking tray – no need for greasing. Bake in the oven until the shortbread begins to take on a faint golden colour. It should take no more than 15 mins. Remove from the oven and leave to cool completely.

Once the shortbread has cooled, you can begin to assemble rest of the recipe. Spread the tin of caramel across the top of the shortbread with the back of a spoon, ensuring that all of the biscuit base is covered.

Break the chocolate into pieces and place into a bowl. Place the bowl of chocolate over a saucepan of boiling water and stir the chocolate as it melts to ensure it is melting evenly and not getting too hot. Using a palette knife, spread the melted chocolate over the caramel. Drag the palette knife across the top of the chocolate creating a smooth finish. Place the tray in the fridge and allow to set for a few hours. Cut into bite size squares before serving using a knife dipped into hot water.

Lots more amazing cake recipes where this one came from – all tried and tasted by Annabel, Grace or one of their friends. Just click here to have a browse.


Cheat’s Salted Caramel Ice Cream

Last time my big sister came to visit I put a lot of time and effort into making the ice cream she wanted before she ate about a spoonful and declared it “too sweet.” As you can imagine, I was quite annoyed.

Usually I don’t go for “cheat” recipes but I wasn’t going to make the same mistake again so I wanted to make something quick and easy but suitably impressive. And delicious. And delicious it was! No one realised that it was not as it seems.

It’s probably a bit grand to call this a recipe, it’s barely a glorified serving suggestion but anyway, here’s how to do it.

  1. Get a tub of fancy fresh custard. Not the yellow stuff made from powder. I used Waitrose’s seriously creamy Madagascan vanilla custard.
  2. Pour custard into ice cream machine and churn. If you don’t have a machine, pour it into a shallow tub (with a lid) and put it in the freezer. Take it out every hour and give it a good stir to break up any ice crystals. It could take 4 or more hours depending on your freezer, the size of your tub, etc.
  3. Get hold of some caramel or dulce de leche. You could make it yourself by putting an unopened tin of condensed milk into a pan of boiling water for 2 hours. Or buy it Carnation do a good one as do Bonne Maman (that’s the one I used). For a 500g tub of custard I used 3 heaped tablespoons of caramel. Add a good pinch of salt to the caramel and stir it in properly. Give it a little taste. Try not to eat it all now.
  4. By now your custard should be vanilla ice cream. Get a freezer tub and put a layer of ice cream in the bottom. Drizzle on some caramel and repeat until you’ve used everything up. Pull a table knife through it a few times to give it a fancy marbled look.
  5. Put the ice cream back in the freezer for at least 30 min to harden up before you serve it. Make sure you chuck all the evidence away.
  6. Serve and enjoy the compliments. ..

Cheat’s chocolate trifle

By combining good-quality dark chocolate with ready-made custard you get an amazing dessert in a very short time frame. Perfect for those last-minute mid-week chocolate cravings.

Ingredients

Method

Ingredients

  • 1 x 225 grams unfilled trifle sponge
  • 250 grams dark chocolate, chopped
  • 1 x 600ml carton ready-made custard
  • 1 x 395-gram tin dulce de leche (see Baker’s Note)
  • ¾ cup cream, whipped to medium peaks
  • Chopped nuts, to serve

Method

  1. Break sponge cake into small pieces (about 4cm x 4cm) and set aside.
  2. Melt chocolate in a small bowl in the microwave on a low heat in 30-second bursts (or in a bowl over simmering water). Stir into custard until well combined.
  3. Place a generous spoonful of dulce de leche in the bottom of 4-6 single-serve jars, glasses or bowls. Scatter over pieces of trifle sponge, then pour over chocolate custard – you want the jar about half full. Use a knife to wriggle the sponge around so that it is covered in custard.
  4. Add another spoonful of dulce de leche and repeat sponge and chocolate custard layers.
  5. Top with a generous dollop of whipped cream. Heat a little dulche de leche in the microwave for 10 seconds at a time until it’s runny, then drizzle over top of cream. Sprinkle with chopped nuts and serve.

Baker's note:

Crockpot Dulce de Leche: Put a tin (or three) of good-quality sweetened condensed milk in the bottom of your crockpot and cover completely with cold water (I can’t stress enough that you cover it completely). Place the lid on the crockpot and cook on low for 8 hours (I usually put it on overnight). Remove tins from crockpot and cool on the bench before storing in the fridge. As dulce de leche keeps forever in the fridge in the sealed tin, it makes sense to make two or three tins at once – assuming you can resist opening them and eating it by the spoonful, that is.


Cheat’s caramel ice-cream

It's no secret I'm an ice-cream addict and I also love to take shortcuts, so this two-ingredient ice-cream ticks both boxes.

Preparation

Skill level

Ingredients

  • 600 ml single (pouring) cream
  • 340 g can caramel or dulce de leche

Cook's notes

Oven temperatures are for conventional if using fan-forced (convection), reduce the temperature by 20˚C. | We use Australian tablespoons and cups: 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml 1 tablespoon equals 20 ml 1 cup equals 250 ml. | All herbs are fresh (unless specified) and cups are lightly packed. | All vegetables are medium size and peeled, unless specified. | All eggs are 55-60 g, unless specified.

Instructions

Freezing time: 3-4 hours.

1. Place the cream in a bowl and whisk until soft peaks have almost formed.

2. Mix the caramel until smooth and fold into the cream.

3. Place in a metal container and cover. Freeze for 3–4 hours or until firm. Serve in scoops.


Cheat’s Dulce de Leche

It’s no secret to anyone who knows me that I have a very sweet tooth. So imagine my delight at every hostel I stayed at in Argentina and Uruguay when each breakfast came complete with dulce de leche, the classic spreadable caramel that is liberally dolloped on desserts, cakes and even toast. No matter how dodgy the coffee, how tepid the ‘orange fruit drink’ or how stale the bread, there was always dulce de leche to smother it and more than compensate. My favourite way to eat it was as ‘Flan con dulce’, basically a crème caramel slathered in the stuff. Heaven.

It’s quite the trendy condiment these days and I’ve gotta say I’m glad of it. If you’re craving alfajores de maicena, those delicious cornflour-based biscuits sandwiched together with thick dulce de leche and rolled sparingly in caramel, you could make them yourself, and no doubt I will at some point. But if you can’t be bothered, don’t worry as Argentinian cake shops are popping up all over Sydney, from La Paula in Kingsford to Baker Street in Ultimo to Sugarloaf Patisserie in Kogarah.

You’ve probably heard of this cheat’s version of dulce de leche, and I have to admit it’s not quite as good as the real thing, either homemade or mass produced. The traditional way of making it involves boiling and stirring a litre of milk with sugar until you reach the point of thick caramel deliciousness. However, the cheat’s version yields an acceptable result, and when you consider how little effort goes into it.

Cheat’s Dulce de Leche

As many tins of sweetened condensed milk as you want dulce de leche
¼ teaspoon vanilla extract per tin (if desired)

Put the tins of sweetened condensed milk into a large pot. Boil enough water to more than cover the tins. Place the pot on the stove and pour the boiling water over the cans. Bring to the boil.

Once the water is boiling, turn the heat down to a simmer. Simmer for 2-3 hours, making sure the tins are completely covered with water at all times as there is a chance they could explode.

Leave the tins to cool in the pot for an hour or more. Empty each tin into an airtight container and stir through the vanilla if using. Serve on everything!


Recipe for Dulce De Leche

Makes 410 grams (1½ cups) (stovetop) OR 550 grams (2 cups) (oven-baked)

Stovetop Dulce De Leche

1 litre (4 cups) full-cream (whole) milk
300 g (10½ oz) granulated sugar
¼ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda (baking soda)
pinch of salt

Heat the ingredients in a heavy-based saucepan over high heat. Just before the mixture comes to the boil, reduce the heat to very low, ensuring that the mixture maintains a very gentle simmer (you may need to adjust the heat accordingly). Cook, stirring often, for about 1 hour, in which time the mixture will darken and thicken. From this point, stir the mixture frequently to avoid it catching and burning. Continue stirring for 20 to 30 minutes, until the mixture is thick and toffee-coloured.

To test if the dulce de leche is ready, place a spoonful on a cold saucer or plate. Allow it to cool and thicken, then run your finger through the centre of the dulce de leche. If the mixture doesn’t pool back, it is ready. Transfer to a bowl and allow to cool completely.

Oven-baked Dulce De Leche

2 x 395 g (14 oz) tins sweetened condensed milk

Preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F). Pour the condensed milk into a 1 litre (4 cup) baking dish and cover with foil. Sit the baking dish in a larger dish and pour enough boiling water to come half way up the sides of the dish with the condensed milk. Cook in the oven, topping up with boiling water to maintain the level, for 2 hours, or until the condensed milk is toffee-coloured (the top will be darker). Carefully remove from the oven and stir to combine while still warm. Set aside to cool completely.

Transfer the dulce de leche to a very clean and dry glass jar. It will keep in the fridge for 2 to 3 weeks.

Recipe from The Food of Argentina: Asado, empanadas, dulce de leche and more, by Ross Dobson and Rachel Tolosa Paz, published by Smith Street Books. Recipe and photo reproduced with the publisher’s permission. Photography © Rachel Tolosa Paz Food styling © Vanessa Austin.


Super simple dulce de leche

For those who aren’t familiar with dulce de leche, it is a South American confectionary that roughly translates into sweet made from milk. Traditional dulce de leche is made by slowly heating sweetened milk until it becomes a deep copper colour and has a thick, spreadable consistency. This decadent caramel-like sweet is delicious when eaten by the spoonful. Alternatively, it can be used in alfajores, on top of crepes and between cake layers. The best part is that there is a cheat’s way of making this amazing treat! And, this method involves pretty much no effort at all! In fact, all it requires is a can of condensed milk.

Now, this is trick that I am sure many of you are already familiar with. However, I decided it was worth sharing for those who have yet to learn it.

The simple steps are as follows:
  1. First, boil a can of condensed milk for 3.5 hours. Make sure the can stays immersed under water.
  2. When it has cooled slightly, open the can and stir in a sprinkling of sea salt.
  3. Eat/use and enjoy your very own can of dulce de leche!

Since the discovery of this simple recipe, my housemate and I have gone a little bananas and boiled many cans of condensed milk. While some cans were used immediately, others were stashed away for spontaneous indulgences. I hope that you find this dulce de leche recipe as handy as we have!

Looking for something to make with your can of caramel goodness? It is the perfect filling for these delicious doughnuts! Alternatively, you can be patient and wait until next week. Why? Because I am going to sharing yet another biscuit recipe linking directly to this one!


Cheat's cronuts

The cronut is the newest food craze to make its way over from New York. It's a mix between a croissant and a doughnut, and chef Aaron Craze is here to show us how easy it is to make two varieties: a salted caramel with chocolate glaze and toasted nuts, and a lemon custard filling with a zesty lemon glaze.

Makes: 6 Prep time: 20 minutes Cooking time: 4 minutes per batch

500g pre-made croissant dough 500ml Vegetable or sunflower oil

For the salted caramel filling

half a 397g tin of caramel (dulce de leche) a pinch of flaked sea salt (to your own taste)

For the chocolate glaze

225g dark chocolate broken into pieces 125ml double cream Toasted hazelnuts and peanuts , roughly chopped to sprinkle on top

For the lemon custard

4 medium free-range egg yolks ½ tsp vanilla extract 50g caster sugar 30g cornflour 300ml whole milk 3 tbsp lemon curd For the lemon glaze 100g icing sugar 1 tbsp fresh lemon juice Lemon zest for decoration

First make your fillings and glazes. For the salted caramel filling simply stir a pinch of flaked sea salt into the caramel, start slow so as not to add to much salt. For the chocolate glaze gently melt the broken chocolate with the cream, making sure to mix well, leave this off the heat to cool slightly

To make the lemon ‘cheats cronut’ whisk the egg yolks with the sugar, vanilla extract and corn flour until all the sugar is dissolved. Heat the milk over a medium heat until small bubbles appear at the edge of the pan, pour half the hot milk into the egg mixture and quickly whisk until it’s all well incorporated. Return the mixture to the pan of milk and cook on a gentle heat to thicken the custard (it’s very important to keep stirring the mixture so lumps don’t form). Once it nice and thick, remove it from the heat and transfer to a bowl to cool it down, once cool mix it with the lemon curd

For the glaze combine the icing sugar and lemon juice in a bowl until disolved

Take the pre-made dough base and fold it in half so that it is 2cm thick. use a 9cm ring cutter, cut out 6 doughnuts and then using a 1.5cm cutter, cut out the hole in the middle

Heat a few centimetres of vegetable oil to 170C (use a deep fat fryer if you have it). Test the oil using one of the ‘cheats cronut’ holes to make sure the oil is sizzling. Cook the ‘cheats cronuts’ for 2 minutes before turning in the oil, once cooked the ‘cheats cronuts’ should be puffed up and golden brown

Once cooked remove them from the oil with a metal slotted spoon onto a plate lined with absorbent kitchen paper to cool for a few minutes until they are no longer hot to the touch

Using a 2 plastic syringes, fill one with the cooled custard mixture and inject it in the side of 3 of the ‘cheats cronut’ at 4 equally spaced points and do the same with the salted caramel

Once they have all been filled, dip one flat side of the caramel filled ones on the chocolate and rest them on a wire rack chocolate side up then sprinkle with the chopped nuts. Dip the lemon filled ones with the lemon icing in the same way and decorate with lemon zest once on the wire rack


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1 garlic clove, roughly chopped

1 tbsp apple cider vinegar

sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

Salsa criolla

1 large tomato, seeds removed and diced

1 small red capsicum, diced

1 small green capsicum, diced

60 ml (¼ cup) extra virgin olive oil

2 tbsp apple cider vinegar

sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

1. To make the chimichurri, place the ingredients in the bowl of a food processor and process until you have a well combined, thick green sauce. Season to taste, then transfer to an airtight container and set aside in the fridge.

2. To make the salsa criolla, combine the ingredients in a bowl and set aside for the flavours to infuse. This can be made several hours in advance and kept in the fridge, although it is best eaten on the day it is made. Season to taste, just before serving.

3. Preheat a barbecue grill or hotplate to high. Cut the chorizos in half lengthways and cook on the grill or hotplate for 4 to 5 minutes each side, until slightly charred.

4. Place the baguettes or rolls, cut side down, on the grill for 1 to 2 minutes to soak up the chorizo juices. Place a chorizo in each roll, then top with generous amounts of chimichurri and salsa criolla.

Lomito completo - steak sandwich with the lot. Photo: Rachel Tolosa Paz

Lomito completo (steak sandwich)

This sandwich with the lot has it all: steak, lettuce, tomato and ham, finished off with a fried egg.

INGREDIENTS

1 small red onion, finely chopped

2 tbsp finely chopped flat-leaf parsley

4 x rump steaks (about 200g each and no thicker than 1.5 cm)

100g thinly sliced provolone cheese

4 soft bread rolls, sliced in half

200g thinly sliced leg ham

2 large tomatoes, thinly sliced

1. Combine the garlic, onion, parsley and vinegar in a bowl and set aside.

2. Place a large non-stick frying pan over high heat. Brush the steaks with 1 tablespoon of the oil and cook for 4 minutes on each side for medium rare, or a little longer if you prefer your steak more well done. Top the steaks with the provolone, then remove from the pan and cover to keep warm.

3. Wipe the pan clean and add the remaining oil. Fry the eggs to your liking and transfer to a plate.

4. To assemble the sandwich, spread mayonnaise on the cut sides of the bread rolls. Arrange the lettuce, ham and tomato on the bottom half of each roll. Place the steaks on top followed by the fried eggs. Spoon over some of the onion mixture and serve immediately.

Chocotorta - Argentina's answer to chocolate ripple cake. Photo: Rachel Tolosa Paz

Chocotorta (Chocolate cake)

'Chocotorta' is a common birthday cake in Argentina. The name is a portmanteau of the Spanish words for chocolate and cake, but it also refers to the particular brand of Argentine chocolate biscuits – 'Chocolinas' – which are used to make it. This 'no-bake cake' takes a bit of time and care in assembling, and for best results it really needs a good overnight rest in the fridge for everything to settle down.

INGREDIENTS

500g dulce de leche caramel (store-bought or make your own see recipe below)

1 tbsp unsweetened cocoa powder

250ml (1 cup) full-cream milk

400g Chocolinas or plain uncoated chocolate biscuits

400g dark chocolate (at least 70 per cent cocoa solids), broken into small pieces

1. Lightly grease a 22cm springform cake tin and line the base and side with baking paper.

2. Place the cream cheese and dulce de leche in a bowl and use electric beaters to beat until well combined. Set aside.

3. Whisk the cocoa powder and milk in a bowl, until the cocoa is dissolved. Dip one-third of the biscuits in the cocoa milk for just a few seconds, then transfer to the base of the prepared tin.

4. Spread one-third of the dulce de leche mixture over the biscuits, then repeat with two more layers of dipped biscuits and dulce de leche. Set aside in the fridge.

5. To make the ganache, place the cream in a saucepan over medium heat. When the cream is warm, but not boiling, remove from the heat and add the chocolate but do not mix or beat. Set aside for 10 minutes, then gently stir until smooth and glossy. Pour the ganache over the chocotorta and return to the fridge for at least 6 hours or overnight to set.

6. Remove the chocotorta from the tin and gently remove the baking paper. To serve, warm a knife in hot water, then dry, and cut the cake into thick slices.

Oven-baked dulce de leche. Photo: Rachel Tolosa Paz

Dulce de leche, two ways

Dulce de leche is eaten with almost everything in Argentina. It's spread on toast for breakfast, used to fill pastries and 'alfajores', eaten alongside flans, pancakes and cakes, and is a ubiquitous flavour for ice-cream, but at its most basic you can enjoy it with a spoon straight from the jar!

The milk is the most important ingredient in dulce de leche and the fresher it is, the better the end result. If you can source raw milk (unpasteurised and still containing all the essential fats and cream), you will be rewarded.

Stovetop dulce de leche

Dulce de leche is traditionally made on the stovetop in Argentina. It is a labour of love that must be watched at all times. As odd as this may sound, not all stovetops are alike. If the lowest setting on your stovetop isn't low enough, you may have to use a heat diffuser to avoid the mixture from catching and burning. Constant stirring towards the end of cooking will produce a thick and rich coffee-coloured dulce de leche.

INGREDIENTS

1. Heat the ingredients in a heavy-based saucepan over high heat. Just before the mixture comes to the boil, reduce the heat to very low, ensuring that the mixture maintains a very gentle simmer (you may need to adjust the heat accordingly). Cook, stirring often, for about 1 hour, in which time the mixture will darken and thicken. From this point, stir the mixture frequently to avoid it catching and burning. Continue stirring for 20 to 30 minutes, until the mixture is thick and toffee-coloured.

2. To test if the dulce de leche is ready, place a spoonful on a cold saucer or plate. Allow it to cool and thicken, then run your finger through the centre of the dulce de leche. If the mixture doesn't pool back, it is ready. Transfer to a bowl and allow to cool completely.

Makes 410g

Oven-baked dulce de leche

The cheat's version, oven-baked dulce de leche requires only one ingredient and it is more convenient to make. Cooking a tin of condensed milk in a hot water bath maintains a constant temperature and allows the milk to caramelise and thicken to that distinctive texture and colour.

INGREDIENTS

2 x 395g tins sweetened condensed milk

1. Preheat the oven to 180C.

2. Pour the condensed milk into a 1 litre baking dish and cover with foil. Sit the baking dish in a larger dish and pour enough boiling water to come half way up the sides of the dish with the condensed milk. Cook in the oven, topping up with boiling water to maintain the level, for 2 hours, or until the condensed milk is toffee-coloured (the top will be darker).

3. Carefully remove from the oven and stir to combine while still warm. Set aside to cool completely.

4. Transfer the dulce de leche to a very clean and dry glass jar. It will keep in the fridge for 2 to 3 weeks.

Makes 550g

This is an edited extract from The Food of Argentina: Asado, empanadas, dulce de leche and more by Ross Dobson and Rachel Tolosa Paz, published by Smith Street Books, $49.99 photography © Rachel Tolosa Paz, food styling Vanessa Austin.


Satisfy Your Sweet Cravings With This Dulce De Leche Recipe

Step inside the homes, restaurants and cafes of Argentina with the new cookbook The Food of Argentina and discover this little-known cuisine that is tipped to become a global food trend. Recipes include home-style dishes including pastas, gnocchi and potato tortillas, and caramel flans and local delicacies such as chorizo rolls with salsa criolla, traditional empanadas and veal croquettes. But first try this sweet offering dulce de leche!

MAKES 410 G (14½ OZ/1½ CUPS) (stovetop) OR 550 G (1 LB 3 OZ/ 2 CUPS) (oven-baked)

STOVETOP DULCE DE LECHE

  • 1 litre (34 fl oz/4 cups) full-cream (whole) milk
  • 300 g (10½ oz) granulated sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda (baking soda)
  • pinch of salt

OVEN-BAKED DULCE DE LECHE

To make stovetop dulce de leche, heat the ingredients in a heavy-based saucepan over high heat. Just before the mixture comes to the boil, reduce the heat to very low, ensuring that the mixture maintains a very gentle simmer (you may need to adjust the heat accordingly). Cook, stirring often, for about 1 hour, in which time the mixture will darken and thicken. From this point, stir the mixture frequently to avoid it catching and burning. Continue stirring for 20–30 minutes, until the mixture is thick and toffee-coloured.

To test if the dulce de leche is ready, place a spoonful on a cold saucer or plate. Allow it to cool and thicken, then run your finger through the centre of the dulce de leche. If the mixture doesn’t pool back, it is ready. Transfer to a bowl and allow to cool completely.

To make oven-baked dulce de leche, preheat the oven to 180°C (350°F).

Pour the condensed milk into a 1 litre (34 fl oz/4 cup) baking dish and cover with foil. Sit the baking dish in a larger dish and pour enough boiling water to come half way up the sides of the dish with the condensed milk. Cook in the oven, topping up with boiling water to maintain the level, for 2 hours, or until the condensed milk is toffee-coloured (the top will be darker).

Carefully remove from the oven and stir to combine while still warm. Set aside to cool completely.

Transfer the dulce de leche to a very clean and dry glass jar. It will keep in the fridge for 2–3 weeks.

Author’s note:

Dulce de leche is eaten with almost everything in Argentina. It’s spread on toast for breakfast, used to fill ‘facturas’ (pastries) and ‘alfajores’, eaten alongside flans, pancakes, and cakes, and is a ubiquitous flavour for ice cream, but at its most basic you can enjoy it with a spoon straight from the jar! Of course, Argentines claim dulce de leche as their own invention and it is the one thing that Argentines living outside of Argentina miss the most.

The milk is the most important ingredient in dulce de leche and the fresher it is, the better the end result. If you can source raw milk (unpasteurised and still containing all the essential fats and cream), you will be rewarded.

Dulce de leche is traditionally made on the stovetop in Argentina. It is a labour of love that must be watched at all times. As odd as this may sound, not all stovetops are alike. If the lowest setting on your stovetop isn’t low enough, you may have to use a heat diffuser to avoid the mixture from catching and burning. Constant stirring towards the end of cooking will produce a thick and rich coffee-coloured dulce de leche.

Alternatively known as the cheat’s version, oven-baked dulce de leche requires only one ingredient and it is more convenient to make. Cooking a tin of condensed milk in a hot water bath maintains a constant temperature and allows the milk to caramelise and thicken to that distinctive texture and colour.

Extracted from The Food of Argentina by Ross Dobson and Rachel Tolosa Paz, published by Smith Street Books, RRP AU$49.99 or NZ$59.99 Photography © Rachel Tolosa Paz | Food styling © Vanessa Austin



Comments:

  1. Kazram

    There is something in this. Thank you for the information, now I will not make such a mistake.

  2. Gilibeirt

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  3. Read

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